Oral sex intercourse

Duration: 8min 20sec Views: 1567 Submitted: 07.08.2019
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A "birds and the bees" talk with your kids isn't complete without a discussion of oral sex, according to a new study that found a connection between oral sex and old-fashioned intercourse. The three-year survey found that teens who had oral sex by the end of ninth grade were at the highest risk of having sexual intercourse during high school. These teens had a percent chance of having intercourse by the end of ninth grade and a percent chance by the end of 11th grade. Meanwhile, teenagers who did not have oral sex until the end of 11th grade had only a percent chance of having intercourse by the end of that school year. The survey also found that most sexually active teenagers will start having oral sex and intercourse within the same six-month period. Health care providers, parents and educators should directly address oral sex and its risks with teens, according to study researcher Bonnie Halpern-Felsher, a professor of pediatrics at University of California, San Francisco.

Is oral sex less risky than intercourse?

Is oral sex less risky than intercourse? | Sexual Infections | Patient

Oral sex , sometimes referred to as oral intercourse , is sexual activity involving the stimulation of the genitalia of a person by another person using the mouth including the lips, tongue, or teeth and the throat. Cunnilingus is oral sex performed on the vulva or vagina , while fellatio is oral sex performed on the penis. Oral sex may be performed as foreplay to incite sexual arousal before other sexual activities such as vaginal or anal intercourse , [1] [3] or as an erotic and physically intimate act in its own right. However, the transmission risk for oral sex, especially HIV transmission, is significantly lower than for vaginal or anal sex.

Correlates of Oral Sex and Vaginal Intercourse in Early and Middle Adolescence

CONTEXT: Early sexual initiation is associated with elevated teenage pregnancy and STD risk, yet little is known about the prevalence and correlates of sexual behavior among young adolescents. Better information is needed to guide interventions to prevent early sexual debut. METHODS: Data from a survey of 4, sixth-, seventh- and eighth-grade students at 14 urban public schools in Southern California were analyzed using chi-square tests and logistic regression, to identify correlates of oral sex, intercourse and both.
This study examined whether a comprehensive set of psychosocial factors was equally predictive of both adolescent vaginal intercourse and oral sex among 1, adolescents aged 12— Logistic regressions were used to examine the relationships between parental communication, religiosity, bonding to school, heavy drinking, sex expectancies, normative beliefs, and both oral sex and vaginal intercourse. Age, gender, bonding to school, heavy drinking, and negative health expectancies predicted both oral sex and vaginal intercourse. Parental communication was associated with vaginal intercourse but not oral sex. Behavior-specific normative beliefs were differentially associated with oral and vaginal sex.